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Lowell Catholic in the News


Lowell Catholic honors veterans, including 2005 grad Pfc. Landry
From left, LC graduate Patrick McPhillips (2005), senior Owen Kelly (Lowell) and graduate Chelsea Rafferty (Class of 2010), who is now an English teacher
From left, LC graduate Patrick McPhillips (2005), senior Owen Kelly (Lowell) and graduate Chelsea Rafferty (Class of 2010), who is now an English teacher at the school, stand with a photo of 2010 graduate Pfc. John Landry Jr., who died in the line of duty in 2007. Owen is this year s recipient of the PFC John Landry Jr. Memorial Scholarship. COURTESY PHOTO

Lowell Catholic honors veterans, including 2005 grad Pfc. Landry



LOWELL -- Lowell Catholic celebrated United States veterans in several ways. The day began with a prayer service for seventh- through 12th grades in honor of LC's veteran community, especially Pfc. John F. Landry Jr., a 2005 graduate of Lowell Catholic who sacrificed his life in the line of duty in Baghdad on March 17, 2007.

Sarah Solomon sang the national anthem, and Owen Kelly led the assembly in the Pledge of Allegiance.

Head of School Maryellen Demarco reminded students that as a Xaverian Brothers Sponsored School, LC's focus is on mission and identity. She said that in her time at LC, several students have gone on to serve the country, and she urged students to keep them in their prayers.

Patrick McPhillips, a 2005 graduate and classmate of Landry, illustrated for the students who John was when he was a high-school student. He spoke from the heart about the Crusader they called the "Gentle Giant," and reminded current students that there is a city square named in John's honor only blocks away from the school at Forest and Stevens streets. Landry was Lowell's first casualty of the war and served in the Army's 2nd Battalion in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

In attendance was Jaime Melendez Jr., director of veterans services in Lawrence, who works closely with Donna Rivera, a cousin of Landry. After the service, Melendez said, "As a veteran, I think of my friends, those we lost.

 

 

We always say, 'Lest we forget,' and I think that the way Lowell Catholic is remembering our veterans and especially Pfc. Landry is absolutely beautiful. It means so much to keep that spirit alive."

Lowell Catholic students at all grade levels created cards of thanks for veterans. Chelsea Rafferty, an LC graduate and current English teacher, also coordinated with several veterans who took time to meet with the student reporters of the REWIND student newspaper to be interviewed for an upcoming article.

LC is looking to expand its database of alumni veterans. If you know of anyone who has served in our armed forces and is an alumnus of Lowell Catholic or one of its Legacy Schools (Saint Margaret, Saint Louis Academy, Saint Patrick High School, Saint Joseph High School, Keith Catholic, Keith Academy and Keith Hall), contact Robbie Barnes, senior advancement coordinator, at rbarnes@lowellcatholic.org or 978-452-1794, ext. 141.

Anyone interested in donating to the PFC John F. Landry Memorial Scholarship Fund should contact Nicole Sharpe at nsharpe@lowellcatholic.org or visit www.lowellcatholic.org.

Lowell Catholic unveils plans for new building
Lowell Catholic unveils plans for new building

 

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LOWELL - Starting in the spring, Lowell Catholic High School will expand its Stevens Street campus with a new, 25,000-square-foot building.

"We're very excited," said Head of School Maryellen DeMarco. "It is the culmination of our strategic plan we've worked on the last few years to add a building to our blueprint in order to make sure we expand the facility to meet our growing population and to enhance the programs that we have at the school."

The $5 million building will be placed directly behind the main school building on what is now the parking lot, she said. What is now the football practice field will become the parking lot, and Lowell Catholic will work with other local schools to provide space for football practice, DeMarco said.

She said the school is "bursting at the seams," and the new building will take care of space concerns while allowing for future growth.

The last structures to be built on campus were Keith Gymnasium and McNamara Hall, which opened in 2006.

The project will begin in March and is expected to take about a year.

The new facility will feature an expanded learning commons about triple the size of the school's current library, DeMarco said. The library in the legacy hall will be turned back into a chapel, she said.

"It really affords us an opportunity to have a state-of-the-art learning commons with all the technology that students need today," said Director of Advancement Nicole Sharpe.

 
 
 

 

It will also have an expanded dining hall and additional classroom space including a physics lab and art room.

The school is working with Gavin & Sullivan Architects and Charter Brothers Construction on the facility, which will mirror the look and feel of the other buildings on campus, DeMarco said.

The school is undertaking a $3 million capital campaign to assist with the construction costs. After about two years of "silent" campaigning, it is about halfway to its goal, DeMarco said.

She said the project will not impact tuition rates, which are adjusted annually.

DeMarco said there is a "marked increase in interest in Lowell Catholic," especially at the middleschool level, where the seventh grade has a wait-list.

"The numbers are growing very strong, so we want to make sure that we're here to provide a Catholic education to all those in the Greater Lowell area that are asking for it," she said.

Class sizes are currently about 100 students per grade at the high school level, Sharpe said.

With the addition, DeMarco said she expects the school could expand each grade by 20 students over the next four to five years.

For more information about how to donate to the capital campaign, visit www.lowellcatholic.org/capital_ campaign or call Sharpe at 978-452-1794 ext. 136.

An admissions information session will be held at 6 p.m. Tuesday at McNamara Hall.

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Concept drawing of the new, 25,000-square-foot building Lowell Catholic High School will construct on its Stevens Street campus beginning in the spring.
Concept drawing of the new, 25,000-square-foot building Lowell Catholic High School will construct on its Stevens Street campus beginning in the spring. COURTESY PHOTO

LOWELL - Starting in the spring, Lowell Catholic High School will expand its Stevens Street campus with a new, 25,000-square-foot building.

"We're very excited," said Head of School Maryellen DeMarco. "It is the culmination of our strategic plan we've worked on the last few years to add a building to our blueprint in order to make sure we expand the facility to meet our growing population and to enhance the programs that we have at the school."

The $5 million building will be placed directly behind the main school building on what is now the parking lot, she said. What is now the football practice field will become the parking lot, and Lowell Catholic will work with other local schools to provide space for football practice, DeMarco said.

She said the school is "bursting at the seams," and the new building will take care of space concerns while allowing for future growth.

The last structures to be built on campus were Keith Gymnasium and McNamara Hall, which opened in 2006.

The project will begin in March and is expected to take about a year.

The new facility will feature an expanded learning commons about triple the size of the school's current library, DeMarco said. The library in the legacy hall will be turned back into a chapel, she said.

"It really affords us an opportunity to have a state-of-the-art learning commons with all the technology that students need today," said Director of Advancement Nicole Sharpe.

 
 
 
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It will also have an expanded dining hall and additional classroom space including a physics lab and art room.

The school is working with Gavin & Sullivan Architects and Charter Brothers Construction on the facility, which will mirror the look and feel of the other buildings on campus, DeMarco said.

The school is undertaking a $3 million capital campaign to assist with the construction costs. After about two years of "silent" campaigning, it is about halfway to its goal, DeMarco said.

She said the project will not impact tuition rates, which are adjusted annually.

DeMarco said there is a "marked increase in interest in Lowell Catholic," especially at the middleschool level, where the seventh grade has a wait-list.

"The numbers are growing very strong, so we want to make sure that we're here to provide a Catholic education to all those in the Greater Lowell area that are asking for it," she said.

Class sizes are currently about 100 students per grade at the high school level, Sharpe said.

With the addition, DeMarco said she expects the school could expand each grade by 20 students over the next four to five years.

For more information about how to donate to the capital campaign, visit www.lowellcatholic.org/capital_ campaign or call Sharpe at 978-452-1794 ext. 136.

An admissions information session will be held at 6 p.m. Tuesday at McNamara Hall.



Read more: http://www.lowellsun.com/local/ci_31444097/lowell-catholic-unveils-plans-new-building-video#ixzz4yVUeDy9h

 
 
 
 
 
 

Concept drawing of the new, 25,000-square-foot building Lowell Catholic High School will construct on its Stevens Street campus beginning in the spring.
Concept drawing of the new, 25,000-square-foot building Lowell Catholic High School will construct on its Stevens Street campus beginning in the spring. COURTESY PHOTO

LOWELL - Starting in the spring, Lowell Catholic High School will expand its Stevens Street campus with a new, 25,000-square-foot building.

"We're very excited," said Head of School Maryellen DeMarco. "It is the culmination of our strategic plan we've worked on the last few years to add a building to our blueprint in order to make sure we expand the facility to meet our growing population and to enhance the programs that we have at the school."

The $5 million building will be placed directly behind the main school building on what is now the parking lot, she said. What is now the football practice field will become the parking lot, and Lowell Catholic will work with other local schools to provide space for football practice, DeMarco said.

She said the school is "bursting at the seams," and the new building will take care of space concerns while allowing for future growth.

The last structures to be built on campus were Keith Gymnasium and McNamara Hall, which opened in 2006.

The project will begin in March and is expected to take about a year.

The new facility will feature an expanded learning commons about triple the size of the school's current library, DeMarco said. The library in the legacy hall will be turned back into a chapel, she said.

"It really affords us an opportunity to have a state-of-the-art learning commons with all the technology that students need today," said Director of Advancement Nicole Sharpe.

 
 
 
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It will also have an expanded dining hall and additional classroom space including a physics lab and art room.

The school is working with Gavin & Sullivan Architects and Charter Brothers Construction on the facility, which will mirror the look and feel of the other buildings on campus, DeMarco said.

The school is undertaking a $3 million capital campaign to assist with the construction costs. After about two years of "silent" campaigning, it is about halfway to its goal, DeMarco said.

She said the project will not impact tuition rates, which are adjusted annually.

DeMarco said there is a "marked increase in interest in Lowell Catholic," especially at the middleschool level, where the seventh grade has a wait-list.

"The numbers are growing very strong, so we want to make sure that we're here to provide a Catholic education to all those in the Greater Lowell area that are asking for it," she said.

Class sizes are currently about 100 students per grade at the high school level, Sharpe said.

With the addition, DeMarco said she expects the school could expand each grade by 20 students over the next four to five years.

For more information about how to donate to the capital campaign, visit www.lowellcatholic.org/capital_ campaign or call Sharpe at 978-452-1794 ext. 136.

An admissions information session will be held at 6 p.m. Tuesday at McNamara Hall.



Read more: http://www.lowellsun.com/local/ci_31444097/lowell-catholic-unveils-plans-new-building-video#ixzz4yVUeDy9h

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Concept drawing of the new, 25,000-square-foot building Lowell Catholic High School will construct on its Stevens Street campus beginning in the spring.
Concept drawing of the new, 25,000-square-foot building Lowell Catholic High School will construct on its Stevens Street campus beginning in the spring. COURTESY PHOTO

LOWELL - Starting in the spring, Lowell Catholic High School will expand its Stevens Street campus with a new, 25,000-square-foot building.

"We're very excited," said Head of School Maryellen DeMarco. "It is the culmination of our strategic plan we've worked on the last few years to add a building to our blueprint in order to make sure we expand the facility to meet our growing population and to enhance the programs that we have at the school."

The $5 million building will be placed directly behind the main school building on what is now the parking lot, she said. What is now the football practice field will become the parking lot, and Lowell Catholic will work with other local schools to provide space for football practice, DeMarco said.

She said the school is "bursting at the seams," and the new building will take care of space concerns while allowing for future growth.

The last structures to be built on campus were Keith Gymnasium and McNamara Hall, which opened in 2006.

The project will begin in March and is expected to take about a year.

The new facility will feature an expanded learning commons about triple the size of the school's current library, DeMarco said. The library in the legacy hall will be turned back into a chapel, she said.

"It really affords us an opportunity to have a state-of-the-art learning commons with all the technology that students need today," said Director of Advancement Nicole Sharpe.